Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th Global Summit on Food Processing & Technology San Antonio, USA.

Day 3 :

Keynote Forum

Meera Srivastava

Head, Post Graduate Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, India

Keynote: Agrochemicals: A threat to food safety

Time : 10:00-11:00

OMICS International Food Processing 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Meera Srivastava photo
Biography:

Meera Srivastava is presently working as Head, Post Graduate Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. She is also Convener- Board of Studies in Zoology, and Member- Academic Council, MGS University, Bikaner. She has contributed to more than 152 research publications published in journals of national and international repute and in the form of conference abstracts. She has represented more than 76 Conferences and has visited United Kingdom, France, Scotland, Italy, Thailand, Dubai, Sri Lanka and Malaysia and has been invited to deliver talks, Chair/ Co-Chair Technical sessions.

Abstract:

Food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for the body. Historically, people secured food through two methods: Hunting and gathering, and agriculture. Today, the majority of the food required by the ever increasing population of the world is supplied by the food industry based on agriculture produce. Third agricultural revolution concentrated on industrialization of agriculture with mechanization, chemical farming, food manufacturing, addition of economic value through processing, canning, refining, packaging, green revolution, plant breeding, biotechnology, genetic manipulation, etc. Crop products are eventually stored for varied periods of time depending on market demand, size of production and the farmer’s needs. Herbivorous insects are said to be responsible for destroying one fifth of the world’s total crop production annually. By their very nature, most insecticides create some risk of harm to humans, animals or the environment. Unfortunately, some of the highly hazardous insecticides are continually and indiscriminately used globally. The small farmers prefer those because they are cost-effective, are easily available and display a wide spectrum of bioactivity. It is for sure that insecticides, once enter the environment will have negative impacts on air, water, soil, human beings and animals. Some suggested management strategies include: Integrated pest management (IPM); Use of resistant varieties; Employing biological control measures; Use of bio-pesticides, Sterilization technique, Sex attractants and Pheromones and above all educating farmers. Food safety and food security are monitored by agencies like the: International Association for Food Production, World Resources Institute, World Food Program, Food and Agriculture Organization and International Food Information Council. They address issues such as sustainability, biological diversity, climate change, nutritional economics, population growth, water supply, and access to food.

Break: Refreshment Break 11:00-11:20 @ Foyer
  • Equipment and Techniques |Processing in Food Industry | Recent Advancement in Food Technology
Speaker

Chair

M.G.S.A. Wimalasena

senior Assistant Government Analyst, Central Food Laboratory, Sri Lanka

Speaker

Co-Chair

Meera Srivastava

Head, Post Graduate Department of Zoology, Govt. Dungar College, India

Session Introduction

J. N. Okafor

Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa

Title: Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterraenea (L.) verdc) nutraceutical: An unexplored resource for functional and health foods

Time : 11:20-11:45

Biography:

Jane N Okafor has completed her PhD at University of Nigeria, Nsukka. She is a Deputy Director at Nutrition and Toxicology Division, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi (FIIRO). She has published more than 24 papers in reputed journals. Currently, she is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa.

Abstract:

The use of nutraceutical for various health benefits has increased significantly globally due to risk of toxicity and adverse effects of some synthetic drugs. Nutraceutical is a food or a part of food that provides medical benefits apart from nutrients that includes prevention and or treatment of a disease. It is therefore not unexpected that they have wide range of application. Bambara groundnut is an under-utilized legume with rich nutritional profile and widely used in African traditional medicine but have not been exploited for their vast nutraceutical potential. When compared to other beans, it has highest concentration of dietary/soluble fiber, rich in polyphenols (anthocyanin, catechin, quercetin and their derivatives, quinic acid, medioresinol, p-coumaric acid, salicylic acid, caffeic acid derivative), polyunsaturated fatty acids, antioxidant vitamins/minerals and protein. However, with increasing interest in plantbased nutraceuticals for various health applications due to their biological and pharmacological activities, it becomes clear that this African indigenous legume also represent a potential source of nutraceutical to be exploited for health benefits. It is surprising that there is limited published information on its nutraceutical potential and medicinal benefits. The objective of this paper is to provide information regarding new and value added uses for Bambara groundnut relative to as potential nutraceutical source for various end uses and to provide a sense of how important this potential value added traits could be on exploitation and application in functional food development. Lastly, we focused on the remaining research work to be done in order for Bambara groundnut to find wider application in functional food, pharmaceutical industry/medicine.

Speaker
Biography:

Mokganya Mokgaetji Georgina is currently enrolled for PhD (Botany) at the University of Venda, South Africa. She is working as a Lecturer at the University of Venda responsible for teaching Foundation Biology.

Abstract:

The use of wild plants as leafy vegetables is very common in South Africa and some of these species are also very popular. Now, wild edible vegetables are in vogue as they fill the streets of Venda shopping market. These plants are favored by majority of local people because they host desirable traits: many of them are richer in protein, vitamins, iron and other nutrients than popular nonnative crops. This reason therefore makes wild edible vegetables a potent weapon against dietary deficiencies. This study presents the processing methods of selected wild edible vegetables of the Vhembe District Municipality. Processing methods of ten wild vegetables (Amaranthus dubius, Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus spinosus, Bidens pilosa L., Cleome gynandra L., Cleome monophylla L., Cucurbita pepo L., Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam, Momordica balsamina and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) were studied. Results of this study provided evidence that, of the ten studied plant species, three (that is, Cucurbita pepo L., Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) are capable of providing food from their leaves, fruits and flowers; leaves and fruits; and leaves and fruits respectively. Additionally, the study revealed that the leafy parts of Amaranthus dubius, Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus spinosus, Bidens pilosa L., Cleome gynandra L., Cleome monophylla L., Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam, and Momordica balsamina can be processed together to make delicious dish called morogo. Leaves, fruits and flowers of Curcurbita pepo L. are mixed to make relish called bovhola. On the other hand, fruits of Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam are boiled and consumed as side dish. Results of this study recommend the proper mixing of the wild vegetables during the process of being processed as food. This recommendation will assist
in preventing the mixture of vegetables with common nutritional values.

Biography:

Mulatua Hailu Metaferia has completed her masters at the age 27 from Haramaya University, Ethiopia. She has published three articles extracted from my master’s thesis and two articles while working as lecturer/researcher at Haramaya University, Ethiopia. Currently, she is studying her PhD at the University of Sydney, Australia.

Abstract:

Foodborne disease outbreaks associated with fresh produce have been reported from several countries around the world in recent decades due to Salmonella. The main route for the contamination of fresh produce in the field is through the use of fresh or partially contaminated manure/compost. Since the survival of Salmonella in manure or soil is affected by climatic and soil factors, the persistence of Salmonella in two soil types (sandy loam and clay) was studied under three temperature (5, 21, 37ºC), two moisture regimes (fluctuating and constant), with or without chicken manure amendments over 45 days of incubation under controlled condition with the aim of determining the persistence of Australian serovars of Salmonella under different environmental
conditions. A generalized linear mixed model was used to analyze Salmonella count data. All analyses were performed using the glimmer function from the lme4 package in R. All significant tests were done using Wald’s test and the level of significant was, P < 0.05. Generally, the survival of Salmonella is found to be longer under low temperature (5ºC > 21ºC > 37ºC), in clay soil, constant moisture and with chicken manure amendments. The next phase of the project was to determine the field conditions under which cover crops or cover crop-solarisation treatments might be used to remediate Salmonella-infected soil. Three different cover crops (mustard cv.caliente 199, radish and sorghum cv.fumigat8tor) and black plastic was used to treat Salmonella contaminated soil. Cover crop-solarisation treatment is appeared to be effective in suppressing Salmonella in the soil than cover crop alone.

Biography:

Prakash Chandra Subedi has completed his Master in Development Studies from College of Development Studies (CDS), Purbanchal University, Kathmandu, Nepal and also Master in Rural Development from Tri Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal. He is the Researcher of a project “Policy Issues and Evidences on Increasing Fallow Land and Food Threats”of College of Development Studies (CDS) and MODE Nepal with consultative support from Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Forest and Ministry of Land Reform.

Abstract:

Family farming is the family based farming activities, where farmers cultivate their farm themselves and all the members of the family are engaged in farming. This study was conducted to examine the food sufficiency level of family farmers and, was carried in the four VDCs of Kavrepalanchowk district. A total of 115 households determined as the sample size from each of the four VDCs were randomly visited for interview in the study. The size of land holding was found to be very small and fragmented. The quality of soil was fertile and could yield high production if irrigation existed. The labour used patterns were significant number of family labour but due to high youth migration there were labour shortage. The rate of adoption of agri-technology was low but the households adopting insectides/pesticides and chemical fertilizers were found to be high without any knowledge regarding its using techniques. In conclusion, the study highpoint that the crop production and food sufficiency level of the family farmers of the Kavrepalanchowk district is decreasing. Many farmers were leaving their farming and started seeking opportunity to go for foreign employment or engaged in non-agricultural activities. If no action is taken timely, there may come situation that we will have to depend on imports for all the food requirements. Thus, the study reveals that the family farming could act as an agent for ensuring food sufficiency for all, if proper policies is promoted to farmers with legal titles to their land or given their share of respect and responsibilities that farming as honorable profession.

Break: Lunch Break:13:00-14:00 @ Texas C