Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th Global Summit on Food Processing & Technology San Antonio, USA.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Food Processing 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aubrey F Mendonca photo
Biography:

Aubrey F Mendonca is an Associate Professor and Food Safety Microbiologist at Iowa State University, USA, where he lectures to both graduate and undergraduate students and conducts food safety research. He teaches courses such as Food Microbiology, Foodborne Hazards, and Advanced Food Microbiology, and conducts research in Microbial Food Safety. Additionally, he provides food safety consultation and conducts training on practical food safety and microbiology for food processors nationally and internationally. His research focuses on control of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms using non-thermal technologies such as high pressure processing, ultra violet radiation, and electron beam irradiation, alone or combined with natural antimicrobials. He has numerous published papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has written several book chapters on control of foodborne microorganisms. He has established collaborations with food manufacturing companies in regard to pathogenic challenge testing of foods to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of non-thermal food processes.

Abstract:

Dynamic characteristics of food processing technologies: Challenges in meeting consumer expectations for food safety and quality. The growing demand and expectations of health conscious consumers for foods that are safe, nutritious, fresh-like, and synthetic preservative-free, are major drivers of technological change and innovation in the food industry. In past decades, food manufacturers enjoyed abundant sales of their products while presenting erroneous or deceptive food labels with misleading information to customers. Today this scenario is becoming increasingly difficult to continue due to the broad consumer access to information sources. Through social media and smartphones consumers are now informed of issues such as food safety, nutrition, health, and the potentially harmful effects of certain food preservatives. This social interconnectedness, information sharing and consumer self-education are demanding an unprecedented accountability from the food industry to deliver safe wholesome fresh-like food products. In response to consumer demand, food manufacturers are challenged and forced to explore application of modern food processing technologies. In this regard, they strongly rely on research efforts of food scientists, nutrition scientists, food technologists and engineers in academic institutions, research centers and the food industry. Therefore, we as food science/technology professionals play a very important role in research involving novel technologies to provide food products that meet consumer expectations and which can be manufactured on a large scale by the food industry. However, considering the very complex nature of foods, changes in processing and preservation techniques almost always cause alterations (acceptable or unacceptable) in microbial, nutritional and/or sensory quality of food products. This reality makes it challenging for scientists to successfully achieve food research objectives based on consumer expectations without a multidisciplinary research team approach. The varied disciplines represented by national and international professionals at this Global Food Safety Conference offer us a unique opportunity to network and develop long-lasting collaborations to enhance our efforts to help the food industry in the production of safe wholesome food for consumers.

Break: Refreshment Break 11:15-11:35 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

Lubos Zabransky

Assistant Professor, University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic

Keynote: Influence of selected feed supplements on the growth and health of calves

Time : 11:35-12:20

OMICS International Food Processing 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lubos Zabransky photo
Biography:

Lubos Zabransky works as an Assistant Professor with academic title for feeding livestock at the Department of Animal Husbandry Sciences. His specialty is mainly calves nutrition and the use of probiotic, prebiotic, symbiotic and other additive feed additives in livestock nutrition. He is Head of Diploma and Bachelor thesis, Co-investigator of grants NAZV, filed two patents, authored or co-authored four articles impacted, one certified methodology, many peer-reviewed articles and
contributions to proceedings with international participation.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to prove the hypothesis that the growth and health of calves are dependent on feed supplements with an antidiarrhoeic effect, in relation to sex, season of birth, and number of the dam’s lactations. A total of 186 calves were included in the experiment. After birth the calves were divided into three treatment groups: Ascophyllum nodosum (brown seaweed hydrolyzate, prebiotics), Lactobacillus sporogenes (probiotics), and the control group. All calves were weighed within two hours after birth. The growth and health were investigated from the birth to the fourth week of age. Compared to the control, a significant effect of applied feed supplements was found in the Lactobacillus sporogenes group in the body weight at 28 days of life (P<0.01) and in the average daily gains (P<0.001). We concluded from the analysis that only the use of Lactobacillus sporogenes had a positive influence on increasing the growth. Neither of the two supplements had a positive
impact on the health of calves.

  • Symposium
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Daraba is Associate professor at University “Dunarea de Jos” of Galati, Romania and Research Associate at Iowa State University, USA. She holds a PhD and MSc from University “Dunarea de Jos” of Galati, Romania. Dr. Daraba was a Norman Bourlaug/USAID Fellow at University of Kentucky, USA, and a postdoctoral fellow at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki funded by the Greek Government. Her area of expertise is food safety and quality, and HACCP in food industry and food service units. She works extensively in reviewing for scientific journals and national interest projects (Meat Science journal-USA; Graduate Women in Science Fellowships-USA; Action “Cooperation 2011”- Ministry of Education, Lifelong Learning & Religious Affairs – Greece). Dr. Daraba organized several international workshops and webinars in the area of food safety and HACCP held in the USA, Romania, and Haiti. She was a food safety and HACCP trainer for Haitian food processors under USAID/FAVACA/PADF project. She authored and co-authored books and book chapters, research publications, and scientific presentations in the area of food safety and quality, foodborne pathogens control using non-thermal technologies and natural antimicrobials, and HACCP.
 
Aubrey F Mendonca is an Associate Professor and Food Safety Microbiologist at Iowa State University, USA, where he lectures to both graduate and undergraduate students and conducts food safety research. He teaches courses such as Food Microbiology, Foodborne Hazards, and Advanced Food Microbiology, and conducts research in Microbial Food Safety. Additionally, he provides food safety consultation and conducts training on practical food safety and microbiology for food processors nationally and internationally. His research focuses on control of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms using non-thermal technologies such as high pressure processing, ultra violet radiation, and electron beam irradiation, alone or combined with natural antimicrobials. He has numerous published papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has written several book chapters on control of foodborne microorganisms. He has established collaborations with food manufacturing companies in regard to pathogenic challenge testing of foods to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of non-thermal food processes.

 

Abstract:

There is increasing consumer demand for foods that are safe, nutritious, fresh-like and devoid of synthetic food preservatives. While properly applied thermal processes such as heat pasteurization, ultra-high temperature, and canning can ensure microbial safety of foods, those processes can destroy heat labile nutrients and negatively alter certain sensory characteristics. Several chemical food preservatives such as potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, sulfites, nitrite and parabens have been traditionally used in foods to effectively control pathogenic and spoilage organisms; however, these preservatives are perceived
by consumers as substances that are unsafe and likely to have long-term negative effects on human health. Such consumer perception decreases acceptance of traditionally-processed foods that will in turn negatively affect food product sales and future industry income. In response to changing consumer expectations of food products, and challenges posed by thermal and certain other traditional food processes, many food manufacturers are ardently exploring the application of non-thermal processing technologies for foods. The aim of this symposium is to highlight the pros and cons of currently used and emerging non-thermal food processing technologies with emphasis on recent advances in food safety applications including hurdle technology approaches. Information will be presented on technologies including, but not limited, to high pressure processing, pulsed electric fields and preservation with naturally derived antimicrobials. The impact of these novel technologies on selected quality characteristics of foods will also be discussed. The symposium will involve presentations that will be delivered by food science and technology professionals from academia and industry who are active researchers in the area of enhancing food safety and quality.

Break: Lunch Break 13:15-14:15 @ Texas C
  • Food Processing & Engineering |Food Biotechnology & Nutrition |Agri-food Technology |akery & Confectionary| Food Microbiology | Food Inspection | Food Fraud : Detection & Prevention
Speaker

Chair

Aura Daraba

Associate professor, Iowa State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Aubrey F. Mendonca

Associate Professor, Iowa State University, USA

Session Introduction

Medhin Kifle

University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Title: Biocontol of Aspergillus flavus in groundnut using Trichoderma harzanium stain kd

Time : 14:15-14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Kifle M H has completed his BSc in Biology from University of Asmara, MSc and PhD in Plant Pathology and Post-doc from University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. His topic of research in MSc was “Screening and evaluation of free-living bacteria as bio fertilizers” and in PhD his topic of research was “Effects of diazotrophic bacteria on maize and wheat growth”.

Abstract:

Pre-harvest infection of groundnut (Arachis hypogea L.) during drought stress by strains of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus is a major health and food safety concern worldwide. The fungi release aflatoxins are carcinogenic and hepatotoxic at levels of parts per billion. In this study, a formulated bio-control agent, Trichoderma harzianum strain kd (Tkd), was used to control Aspergillus flavus infection of groundnut in the field. The growth of Trichoderma from sterilized roots on Trichoderma selective media (TSM) suggested root colonization by Tkd. Moreover, root colonization by Trichoderma was evident in roots from untreated plants with Tkd. Under scanning electron microscopy, T. harzianum showed the ability to parasitize A. flavus by coiling around A. flavus hyphae. The aflatoxin B1 contamination from Aspergillus infection was also determined using a MaxiSignal® ELISA test kit. The aflatoxin content of A. flavus inoculated plants was significantly (P<0.001) higher than the Tkd treated plants. Tkd was able to reduce aflatoxin B1 contamination in groundnut by 57% and 65% in two trials. Yields from plants treated with Tkd were 35% and 49% higher than the control (untreated with Tkd) plants in these field trials. It can be concluded that Tkd may increase crop safety by reducing the infection of the groundnut seeds by Aspergillus flavus, and hence it may reduce the contamination of the seed by aflatoxin under drought stress condition.

Speaker
Biography:

Radhakrishna Shetty as Postdoc has worked primarily on the discovery, cloning and expression of novel high-temperature gluten degrading recombinant mashing enzymes that is useful for the brewing industry. He is actively involved in brewing projects at lab and pilot scale and in particular on studying the use of enzymes and new process equipment for brewing with non-conventional 100% adjunct brewing processes.

Abstract:

Barley sorting is an important step for picking up grain of desired quality. Whilst brewing with 100% sorted barley (picked high quality) has become realistic with addition of exogenous enzymes. The effect of added enzymes on process potentials derived from un-sorted barley (mixed) and sorted-out barley (low quality) were almost not investigated. The aim of this study is to examine the rheological behaviors of sorted out barleys affected by addition of enzymes in comparison with sorted barley, and to evaluate quality attributes derived from respective barleys focusing on wort fermentability and filterability parameters. To achieve this, rapid visco analyzer was used to simulate brewery mashing process by applying two commercial enzymes (Ondea® Pro and Cellic® CTec2) at lab scale (Fig.1). During the simulated process, the rheological profile of low quality barley was markedly different from others, irrespective of enzyme type, whereas small difference was observed between sorted and un-sorted barley. With respect to major wort nutrients for fermentation, the sorted-out barley generated lowest sugar yield, regardless of enzyme used; however, the use of Cellic® CTec2 resulted in significantly higher sugar content compared to Ondea® Pro, irrespective of quality of barley. Interestingly, considerably higher levels of free amino nitrogen were observed resulting from sorted-out barley, likely due to smaller size/weight of barley compared to others. For wort filterability, the Ondea® Pro treatment resulted in significantly lower turbidity and smaller particle size compared to Cellic® CTec2; however, this effect was observed in sorted and un-sorted barley but not in sorted-out barley. Consequently un-sorted barley demonstrated great potential in brewing process with added enzymes, whereas sorted-out barley is
not comparable to sorted barley in terms of rheological behaviors of mashes, as well as nutrient and filtration parameters studied, showing potential as biofuel feedstock that can be degraded to fermentable sugars by enzymes.

Tran Thi My Hanh

National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Japan

Title: Assessment of fragmentation by mastication and the saltiness of surimi gels prepared with various heating conditions

Time : 15:10-15:35

Speaker
Biography:

Tran Thi My Hanh is pursuing his Doctor’s degree in Departement of Food Science and Technology at Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology (TUMSAT). She completed Master’s degree in Aquatic Products Processing at Nha Trang University and Post-graduate training in Quality Management of Fish Handling and Processing at United Nations University-Fisheries Training Programme in Iceland in 2011. She is a Lecturer at Nha Trang University, Vietnam. Her research interests are in the area of “Food processing especially surimi paste products and sensory evaluation of food”.

Abstract:

The strength of taste is thought to be affected not only by the content of tasting components, but also the texture properties of food. To clarify the relationship between the intensity of saltiness and texture of heat-induced surimi-based products, we are investigating by using heat-induced surimi gel as a model. In the previous study, we reported that the suwari gels with different gel strength, there was no significant relationship between the physical properties and saltiness. On the other hand, in the case of modori gels with different gel strength, a clear relationship between physical properties and saltiness was observed. In this study, the differences of fragments size among these samples after mastication was investigated to confirm the above mentioned phenomenon. To prepare various types of gels having different physical properties from the same material, surimi gels were prepared with different salt concentrations (1, 2, and 3%), heating conditions include setting at 30ºC (suwari) and heat-induced degradation at 60ºC (modori). The physical properties of surimi gels were evaluated by puncture test, two-bite texture profile analysis, and measurement of expressible moisture. The temporal change in saltiness during consumption of gel was also evaluated (time-intensity method) using trained sensory panels. The size and number of surimi fragments after mastication were analysed by WinROOF software. In the case of modori gels, the saltiness was strongly related to the fragment size of surimi gel after chewing which reflects the fragility of the samples. This result suggest that the gel property relating to the fragility will contribute the percieved saltiness.

Huan-Yu Lin

Food Industry Research and Development Institute, Taiwan

Title: The current status of genetically modified food in Taiwan

Time : 15:35-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Huan-Yu Lin has completed her PhD from Yang-Ming University and Post-doctoral studies from Academia Sinica. She is a Research Scientist at Food Industry Researchand Development Institute, Taiwan.

Abstract:

Soy is a legume first cultivated in eastern Asia at least 2, 700 years ago. Soy is used to make a variety of foods like tofu, soymilk and meat substitutes in Taiwan. In 2015, Taiwan imported 2.6 million metric tons of soybeans; of that 98% was biotech soybeans. According to the Council of Agriculture (COA), 13% of the soybean was used for feed, 12% for food and 75% for oil in Taiwan. The Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) formulated the GM food safety assessment methods in 2000. As of July 31, 2016, 116 GM foods were approved by TFDA, including 64 corns, 23 soybeans, 21 cottons, 7 canola and 1 sugar beet. In addition to packaged foods, the regulations governing labeling for GM food ingredients were expanded to include food additives and unpackaged foods in 2015. Non-GM food ingredients unintentionally incorporated with more than 3% GM food ingredients will be viewed as GM food ingredients and must be labeled as GM. We develops GM qualitative and/or quantitative detection methods for GM food ingredients in soybeans, corns, rice and potatoes, and has provided the contract test service since 2000. In 2015, there were 437 contract test cases in total for the detection of GM food ingredients, of that 92% were soybeans and soybean related products. The detection for soybean grains represented the major part with a share of 46.7%, followed by soymilk (21.5%). No transgene was found in samples of 90.2% cases with a detection limit of 0.1%. The samples of the remaining 9.8% cases contained less than 3% GM food ingredients.

Speaker
Biography:

Peter Temitope Agboola is a Young Researcher who obtained his Bachelor of Technology Honours degree in Agricultural Economics and Extension at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho, Oyo state. Nigeria. He also holds a Master’s degree in Agricultural Science at the University of South Africa. He has post qualification experience as an Agricultural Scientist and lecturing various agricultural management modules at the University of South Africa. His research focus is on assessing household food security in rural areas.

Abstract:

This study has assessed the welfare shocks and household food insecurity in Ephraim Mogale and Greater Tubatse municipality of Sekhukhune district, Limpopo province in South Africa. The aim of this study is to identify shocks affecting livelihood at household level and also to determine the food insecurity status of households. Structured questionnaire was administered for data collection. 200 households were involved in the study with 100 households selected from each municipality. All response from the questionnaires was tabulated and processed with the use of statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) programme. Three analytical tools were used to achieve the objectives of the study such as, descriptive statistics, household food insecurity assessment scale (HFIAS) and linear regression model. Majority of households experienced different form of shocks in their households. Increase in food prices, high level of livestock disease, drought, death of a household member and chronic illness such as diabetes, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis were the most important shocks experienced. Approximately 22.2% of households were characterized as being food secure, 32.2% as mildly food insecure, 34.2% as moderately food insecure while 11.4% were severely food insecure. The main determinants of food security from the sample survey were education, unskilled wage labor, grants, pension and disability funds whereby high-level of livestock diseases, illness or accidental loss, death of a household member tends to expose households to higher risk of food insecurity. Policy recommendations are made on promoting education in the rural areas. High priority should be given to industrialization in the district which will in turn boost the rate of employment and also add to the economic growth. Policy measures should be made in supporting people and organizations on how to respond to shocks and stresses experienced in their communities.

Break: Refreshment Break 16:25-16:45 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Ogemdi F Eze is a PhD student at University of Reading, United Kingdom in the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences. She is in her second year and has interest in functional ingredients and new product development.

Abstract:

Okara, a by-product of soybean processing, is an underutilised cheap source of soy protein. Soy protein is increasingly popular due to its functional properties and numerous health benefits that are associated with its consumption. Therefore, okara can be considered as a renewable raw material for the extraction of proteins with considerable value for the food industry sector. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of optimising protein extraction from okara using phosphate buffer at different pH values and assess the effect of these buffers on the composition, structural and functional properties of the obtained protein isolates. Okara protein was extracted with 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH values of 9 – 12. It was shown that 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH 12 gave the highest extraction yield (approximately 35%, w/w), compared to much lower values of 4.24%, 5.4% and 12.1% obtained by using 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 9, 10 and 11, respectively. Moreover, the extracted isolates at pH 12 exhibited the highest solubility among other extracts at lower pH values. The results of the emulsion, foaming and water absorption capacities compared with each other except the oil absorption capacities (OAC) which decreased with increase in the pH. SEM and FTIR revealed a similar secondary structure of the isolates. SDS PAGE profile showed the okara isolates contained proteins of similar molecular weight, within the range of 7S beta-conglycinin (48-62 KDa) and 11S glycinin (20 KDa for basic subunit and 34-40 KDa for acidic subunit) proteins.